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Sisco will buy software maker Sourcefire

  • Posted on October 23, 2017 at 5:30 pm

Jakarta (ANTARA News) – Sisco System said it will buy software company Sourcefire Inc. for about $ 2.7 billion to improve the network security services.

Sisco will pay 76 dollars for each share of Sourcefire, 28.6 percent higher than the closing market price premium 59.08 dollars Monday, Reuters said in a report on Tuesday.

The networking equipment company said the deal would likely close the second quarter of 2013 and estimates that there will be a dilution thin on non-GAAP earnings in fiscal year 2014.

Sisco has been losing market share in network security last year, lower than the more innovative rivals such as Networks Inc., Check Point Software Technologies, and Palo Alto Networks Inc..

Sisco compete in Web applications, social media and video streaming that require security protection is more complex than traditional firewalls.

RBC Capital Markets analyst Robert Breza said the deal would eliminate a key competitor in the market for Check Point, Fortinet, and Palo Alto, but also strengthen the position of Sisco in the industry.

It would also create a major competitor in the network security industry, he said, adding that Sourcefire will bring the technology of real-time network awareness (RNA) and intrusion prevention system (IPS) to Sisco.

Ultrabook Not Be Superhero?

  • Posted on October 23, 2017 at 10:31 am

Intel aggressively promote thin laptop “Ultrabook” which recently has begun equipped with a touch screen. Products “2-in-1 ‘was introduced, with various forms of” magic “that can be changed from laptop to tablet and vice versa.

But all of that as not enough to subvert the glory of Apple’s MacBook Air as the pioneer and the most sought after consumer thin laptops, at least for the U.S. market.

In Uncle Sam’s, as revealed by research agency NPD report cited by Cnet, controlled 56 percent of the MacBook Air slim laptop sales during the first five months of 2013.

The remaining 44 percent is divided between partners-manufacturers Intel Ultrabook.

The latest generation MacBook Air (model 2013) also received positive feedback thanks to the durability of the battery reaches a dozen hours and expected to help maintain the market dominance of these devices in a thin laptop.

It should be noted that the battery life of the MacBook Air in 2013 made ​​possible by the Core 4th Generation of Intel. Thus, the processor manufacturers also benefit from the success of the MacBook Air.

But stronghold Windows laptop was not keep silent. In last week’s Build conference, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer said that the hybrid device (2-in-1) with touch screen feature will eliminate the need to carry laptops and tablets separately.

On the other hand, Apple considers that the touchscreen is more suitable to be applied to the iPad than a laptop. Most consumers seem to agree.

Logitech Mouse Patterned Candy Panda and Floral Foray, When is Batik?

  • Posted on October 22, 2017 at 3:15 pm

JAKARTA – Logitech introduced the Logitech ® Wireless Mouse M235 Limited Edition, with a stylish motif. Not only interesting to look at but also reliable and provide a sense of comfort in your hands.
Success with Splash Pink and Black motif Topography, Logitech brings new members from the ranks of Logitech Global Graffiti Collection, the Logitech ® Wireless Mouse M235 with Candy Panda and Floral motifs Foray.
“The latest collection of Global Graffiti we launch to appreciate while meeting society’s demand over a wireless mouse that is not only reliable and convenient to use, but also has a unique shape with a pattern and creative,” said Sutanto Kurniadih, Logitech Country Manager Indonesia in Jakarta, Monday (01/07/2013).
It said the designs are the result of cooperation with the Logitech leading designers from around the world to create a variety of unique styles and patterns that can reflect its creativity and personal style. ”
Logitech ® Wireless Mouse M235 with Candy Panda and Floral motifs Foray was presented with a limited number or limited edition, in which Candy Panda pattern designed by Heiko Windisch, a digital artist from Germany-Australia.
Each design reflects the spirit, joy and beauty that allows users to mix and match with the look of style and theme of daily life.
Logitech ® Wireless Mouse M235 Limited Edition has been available in the Indonesian market with a retail price of USD 19.99 or approximately USD 190 thousand.

Easy Solutions Helps Fight Mobile Banking Fraud with Detect Safe Browsing (DSB) 4.0, Now Available for iPhone and Android

  • Posted on October 21, 2017 at 3:23 pm

Easy Solutions, the Total Fraud Protection® company, today released Detect Safe Browsing (DSB) version 4.0. With DSB 4.0, financial institution can provide an important additional layer of fraud prevention to the end-user, to better protect against malware and other sophisticated threats such as, pharming, man-in-the-middle (MITM) and man-in-the browser (MITB) attacks. With DSB 4.0, Easy Solutions now extends this support to the two most popular mobile platforms: Android and iOS, ensuring that over 90%1 of mobile users can securely access their mobile banking accounts.

The APWG recently reported over 1.3 million confirmed-malicious files for Android alone2, making mobile malware one of the fastest growing classes of threats.

“Mobile banking has become the preferred method for many consumers to conduct their online banking. Unfortunately for financial institutions, some of the most insidious and difficult-to-detect malware is now being targeted at the mobile end-point,” said Daniel Ingevaldson, CTO of Easy Solutions. “With Detect Safe Browsing now available for iPhone and Android devices, financial institutions will be able to provide their customers with a simple and unobtrusive way to secure their mobile banking experience.”

DSB is a critical component of Easy Solutions’ Total Fraud Protection platform, which provides comprehensive fraud protection across all channels, and extended to the end-user. By combining cross-channel risk-scoring, transaction anomaly detection, multi-factor authentication, secure browsing, and detection and take-down services, Easy Solutions blocks criminals at all three phases of the fraud lifecycle – planning, launching, and cashing – while ensuring that authorized users can conduct business.

DSB 4.0 from Easy Solutions provides visibility and real-time intelligence of the threats impacting consumers. Based on a proprietary cross validation technology that prevents re-direction to fraudulent websites, DSB 4.0 includes some of the following capabilities:

  • Secure Mobile Browsing with the DSB App: The free DSB app, now available for both iOS and Android devices, gives customers a simple way to protect bank transactions performed on their mobile device or tablet
  • Accelerated Disinfection: DSB enables customers to quickly deploy on-demand cleanup procedures for malware related advanced persistent threats (APTs), enabling financial institutions to mitigate zero-day and targeted attacks.
  • Active Phishing Protection: DSB provides enhanced phishing protection based on Detect Monitoring Services’ (DMS) black list. Since DMS detects phishing attacks in early stages, DSB users are protected from the very latest phishing scams, minimizing their exposure to fraud.
  • Proactive, Real-time Malware Protection: DSB employs proprietary cross-validation technology that detects DNS poisoning and ensures that the end user can connect to the protected site. When an active redirection is detected, DSB stops the fraudulent connection.

ABOUT EASY SOLUTIONS

Easy Solutions delivers Total Fraud Protection® to over 100 clients, with over 32 million end users. The company’s products protect against phishing, pharming, malware, Man-in-the-Middle and Man-in-the-Browser attacks, and deliver multifactor authentication and transaction anomaly detection. For more information, visit http://www.easysol.net, or follow us on Twitter @goeasysol.

Acer Launches Aspire Z3 AiO PC-605 with 23 inch Full HD Screen

  • Posted on October 19, 2017 at 7:13 pm

Taiwanese electronics company, Acer has just introduced its PC all-in-one new, the Acer Aspire Z3-605. AiO PC this one was relying on a large screen and has a high resolution.

Acer Aspire Z3-605 has a 23-inch touch screen with full HD 1080p resolution. AiO PC offers an Intel Core i3-3227U to support 1TB HDD and 4GB of RAM. In addition, Acer is also preparing AiO PC with Intel Core i5 processor options and 8GB of RAM.

AiO PC was launched with the Windows 8 operating system. This computer also comes with an HDMI port and audio output using the optimized Dolby Home Theater v4 technology. AiO PC is also noted as the first with Harman Kardon speakers. In addition, the computer can also be tilted to the position of 10 to 30 degrees.

Regarding the price, this AiO PCs sold at prices ranging from 699.99 USD or about 7 million dollars.

Yahoo!’s Earnings and the Future of Display Ads

  • Posted on October 19, 2017 at 2:41 pm

Investors were upset that Yahoo! Inc.’s (YHOO) quarterly results showed a sharp drop in display advertising revenue. And, based on its forecasts, that will not get any better soon. The Yahoo! trouble is not an isolated case. Display rates have started to collapse across the industry, making a chance for Internet advertising to expand as fast as it has over the past decade impossible. That represents trouble for tens of thousands of businesses.

Yahoo!’s revenue fell 7% in the second quarter compared to last year, drifting down to $1.22 billion. Wall St. focused mostly on one comment:

Iconic Brands That Just Vanished

GAAP display revenue was $472 million for the second quarter of 2013, a 12 percent decrease compared to $535 million for the second quarter of 2012.

At the same time, there was no evidence that Yahoo!’s audience fell, so the yield from the average display ad fell considerably.

Yahoo! holds a special place among America’s Internet companies. In the United States, according to research firm comScore, it had a monthly audience of unique visitor that was above 192.9 million in May. That put it a very close second to Google Inc.’s (GOOG), which was 193.5 million. Because of its huge size, the trends set by Yahoo! almost certainly represent those of most of the balance of the industry.

States That Drink the Most Beer

The bane of display advertising today is that so many Web properties have decided to stake their futures on content delivered on small devices, which include, primarily, smartphones. All of the evidence indicates that advertisers will pay less for messages they post on these smaller screens. Actually, the amount marketers will pay for this content environment is much, much less than for traditional display ads that appear on personal computers (PCs). In an attempt to chase the online content audience as it migrates away from PCs, Internet companies have badly damaged future revenue prospects. The trouble is that people will watch content on smaller screens whether online content sites like it or not.

Most experts hope that falling display ad rates can be offset by the increase in video content on the Internet. Advertisers will pay a great deal more for video ads than display ads. So, there is a rush to create this sort of programming. But the likelihood that video can balance the drop in display rates appears unlikely.

Beyond Google’s YouTube, the amount of video posted on the Internet by large content companies is relatively small. In May, Google sites had 154.4 million unique video viewers, driven almost exclusively by YouTube. These visitors spent an average of 437 minutes on Google sites in May. After that, video viewership at other sites drops very sharply. For example, Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) sites had 45.2 million unique video viewers in May. The average time these viewers spent watching video on Microsoft sites was only 36.9 minutes, barely more than a half-hour TV show.

Internet advertising may remain at current levels in terms of volume, but the monetary yield from these ads likely will never return.

Talk Nokia Lumia Excellence 1020

  • Posted on October 18, 2017 at 7:54 am

HELSINKI – 41 megapixel camera is a major advantage presented by Lumia 1020. But Nokia claims that there are many other advantages to selling this smartphone.

Head of Marketing and Sales of Nokia in North America Matt Rothschild, said the camera is not the only advantage Lumia 1020. Hardware elements, including the AMOLED screen to accessories Camera Grip and shutter button, says Rothschild, a smartphone is another advantage.

“On the whole, this is what we refer to as the volume of product.’s (Lumia 1020) is very beautiful to grip, has a good balance, and well designed.’s What we call a consideration” Rothschild said, as quoted from Venture Beat, Monday (15/07/2013).

As for the camera, said Rothschild, Lumia 1020 has a very broad target audience, ranging from the professional to make photography only as a hobby.

“But the most important thing for us is that when we talk to customers, they tell us that they want to have a good picture. Everyone knows that smartphones now include photographic device that can be carried anywhere, so this is the core thing that all people are looking for,” he concluded.

Seven signs of dysfunctional engineering teams

  • Posted on October 17, 2017 at 5:00 am

I’ve been listening to the audiobook of Heart of Darkness this week, read by Kenneth Branagh. It’s fantastic. It also reminds me of some jobs I’ve had in the past.

There’s a great passage in which Marlow requires rivets to repair a ship, but finds that none are available. This, in spite of the fact that the camp he left further upriver is drowning in them. That felt familiar. There’s also a famous passage involving a French warship that’s blindly firing its cannons into the jungles of Africa in hopes of hitting a native camp situated within. I’ve had that job as well. Hopefully I can help you avoid getting yourself into those situations.

There are several really good lists of common traits seen in well-functioning engineering organizations. Most recently, there’s Pamela Fox’s list of What to look for in a software engineering culture. More famous, but somewhat dated at this point, is Joel Spolsky’s Joel Test. I want to talk about signs of teams that you should avoid.

This list is partially inspired by Ralph Peters’ Spotting the Losers: Seven Signs of Non-Competitive States. Of course, such a list is useless if you can’t apply it at the crucial point, when you’re interviewing. I’ve tried to include questions to ask and clues to look for that reveal dysfunction that is deeply baked into an engineering culture.

Preference for process over tools. As engineering teams grow, there are many approaches to coordinating people’s work. Most of them are some combination of process and tools. Git is a tool that enables multiple people to work on the same code base efficiently (most of the time). A team may also design a process around Git — avoiding the use of remote branches, only pushing code that’s ready to deploy to the master branch, or requiring people to use local branches for all of their development. Healthy teams generally try to address their scaling problems with tools, not additional process. Processes are hard to turn into habits, hard to teach to new team members, and often evolve too slowly to keep pace with changing circumstances. Ask your interviewers what their release cycle is like. Ask them how many standing meetings they attend. Look at the company’s job listings, are they hiring a scrum master?

Excessive deference to the leader or worse, founder. Does the group rely on one person to make all of the decisions? Are people afraid to change code the founder wrote? Has the company seen a lot of turnover among the engineering leader’s direct reports? Ask your interviewers how often the company’s coding conventions change. Ask them how much code in the code base has never been rewritten. Ask them what the process is for proposing a change to the technology stack. I have a friend who worked at a growing company where nobody was allowed to introduce coding conventions or libraries that the founding VP of Engineering didn’t understand, even though he hardly wrote any code any more.

Unwillingness to confront technical debt. Do you want to walk into a situation where the team struggles to make progress because they’re coding around all of the hacks they haven’t had time to address? Worse, does the team see you as the person who’s going to clean up all of the messes they’ve been leaving behind? You need to find out whether the team cares about building a sustainable code base. Ask the team how they manage their backlog of bugs. Ask them to tell you about something they’d love to automate if they had time. Is it something that any sensible person would have automated years ago? That’s a bad sign.

Not invented this week syndrome. We talk a lot about “not invented here” syndrome and how it affects the competitiveness of companies. I also worry about companies that lurch from one new technology to the next. Teams should make deliberate decisions about their stack, with an eye on the long term. More importantly, any such decisions should be made in a collaborative fashion, with both developer productivity and operability in mind. Finding out about this is easy. Everybody loves to talk about the latest thing they’re working with.

Disinterest in sustaining a Just Culture. What’s Just Culture? This post by my colleague John Allspaw on blameless post mortems describes it pretty well. Maybe you want to work at a company where people get fired on the spot for screwing up, or yelled at when things go wrong, but I don’t. How do you find out whether a company is like that? Ask about recent outages and gauge whether the person you ask is willing to talk about them openly. Do the people you talk to seem ashamed of their mistakes?

Monoculture. Diversity counts. Gender diversity is really important, but it’s not the only kind of diversity that matters. There’s ethnic diversity, there’s age diversity, and there’s simply the matter of people acting differently, or dressing differently. How homogenous is the group you’ve met? Do they all remind you of you? That’s almost certainly a serious danger sign. You may think it sounds like fun to work with a group of people who you’d happily have as roommates, but monocultures do a great job of masking other types of dysfunction.

Lack of a service-oriented mindset. The biggest professional mistakes I ever made were the result of failing to see that my job was ultimately to serve other people. I was obsessed with building what I thought was great software, and failed to see that what I should have been doing was paying attention to what other people needed from me in order to succeed in their jobs. You can almost never fail when you look for opportunities to be of service and avail yourself of them. Be on the lookout for companies where people get ahead by looking out for themselves. Don’t take those jobs.

There are a lot of ways that a team’s culture can be screwed up, but those are my top seven.

Upland Software Hires Brian Wilson as Vice President of Sales

  • Posted on October 16, 2017 at 4:19 pm

AUSTIN, Texas, July 11, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Upland Software, the world’s largest cloud provider of enterprise software for project, portfolio, and work management, today announced that Brian Wilson has joined the company as Vice President of Sales. In this role, he will direct Upland’s global field and inside sales force in aligning clients’ business goals with Upland’s family of best-of-breed applications.

Brian comes to Upland with over twelve years of enterprise technology sales experience. Most recently, he was a Vice President of Sales at Innotas, a cloud provider of project and portfolio management (PPM) software.

“Brian’s experience in the cloud PPM space, proven sales management track record, and focus on a consultative, customer-centric approach will be tremendous assets in helping us achieve our organic growth goals,” commented Ludwig Melik, President of Upland Software. “We are thrilled to have him on the team. One of the exciting aspects of the Upland vision is that it allows us to attract top talent, drawn by the opportunities and challenges of creating the first cloud project, portfolio, and work management provider with real scale.”

Upland’s strategy is to build a family of cloud products that address a comprehensive range of PPM needs from strategic planning to work execution, whether in IT or across the business, managing projects or ad hoc work, or focused on “top-down” portfolio analysis or “bottom-up” productivity. Cloud software has transformed the market with its rapid speed-to-value, scalability, low total cost of ownership, and reduced financial risk, as well as its inherent ability to deliver a real-time data integration and collaboration platform to distributed workforces on a local or global scale. Bringing together strong, established cloud products not only creates economies of scale, but also opportunities to leverage talent, product innovation, and best practices across the Upland family of applications.

“What drew me to Upland are the convictions we share about the transformative potential of project, portfolio, and work management as a business discipline; the power of a cloud delivery model; and the integral role of the sales process in laying the foundations for long-term customer success,” Brian Wilson explained.  “I am also excited to work with such a seasoned, talented sales team. It’s great to be on board.”

Prior to Innotas, Brian held various sales and management positions at Seagate Technology and Fujitsu Computer Products. He holds a Bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Davis in Communication with a minor in Managerial Economics.

About Upland Software

Upland is the world’s largest cloud provider of enterprise software for project, portfolio and work management. Upland is the only cloud software provider that offers a comprehensive family of applications that enable organizations to align their goals, projects and programs, optimize their resource utilization and workflows, and empower teams to collaborate and work effectively.

5 Coding Hacks to Reduce GC Overhead

  • Posted on October 13, 2017 at 2:22 am

In this post we’ll look at five ways in roomates efficient coding we can use to help our garbage collector CPU spend less time allocating and freeing memory, and reduce GC overhead. Often Long GCs can lead to our code being stopped while memory is reclaimed (AKA “stop the world”). Duke_GCPost

Some background

The GC is built to handle large amounts of allocations of short-lived objects (think of something like rendering a web page, where most of the objects allocated Become obsolete once the page is served).

The GC does this using what’s called a “young generation” – a heap segment where new objects are allocated. Each object has an “age” (placed in the object’s header bits) defines how many roomates collections it has “survived” without being reclaimed. Once a certain age is reached, the object is copied into another section in the heap called a “survivor” or “old” generation.

The process, while efficient, still comes at a cost. Being Able to reduce the number of temporary allocations can really help us increase of throughput, especially in high-scale applications.

Below are five ways everyday we can write code that is more memory efficient, without having to spend a lot of time on it, or reducing code readability.

1. Avoid implicit Strings

Strings are an integral part of almost every structure of data we manage. Being much heavier than other primitive values, they have a much stronger impact on memory usage.

One of the most important things to note is that Strings are immutable. They can not be modified after allocation. Operators such as “+” for concatenation actually allocate a new String containing the contents of the strings being joined. What’s worse, is there’s an implicit StringBuilder object that is allocated to actually do the work of combining them.

For example –

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a = a + b; / / a and b are Strings
The compiler generates code comparable behind the scenes:

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StringBuilder temp = new StringBuilder (a).
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temp.append (b);
3
a = temp.toString () / / a new string is allocated here.
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/ / The previous “a” is now garbage.
But it gets worse.

Let’s look at this example –

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String result = foo () + arg;
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result + = boo ();
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System.out.println (“result =” + result);
In this example we have 3 StringBuilders allocated in the background – one for each plus operation, and two additional Strings – one to hold the result of the second assignment and another to hold the string passed into the print method. That’s 5 additional objects in what would otherwise Appear to be a pretty trivial statement.

Think about what happens in real-world scenarios such as generating code a web page, working with XML or reading text from a file. Within a nested loop structures, you could be looking at Hundreds or Thousands of objects that are implicitly allocated. While the VM has Mechanisms to deal with this, it comes at a cost – one paid by your users.

The solution: One way of reducing this is being proactive with StringBuilder allocations. The example below Achieves the same result as the code above while allocating only one StringBuilder and one string to hold the final result, instead of the original five objects.

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StringBuilder value = new StringBuilder (“result =”);
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value.append (foo ()). append (arg). append (boo ());
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System.out.println (value);
By being mindful of the way Strings are implicitly allocated and StringBuilders you can materially reduce the amount of short-term allocations in high-scale code locations.

2. List Plan capacities

Dynamic collections such as ArrayLists are among the most basic dynamic structures to hold the data length. ArrayLists and other collections such as HashMaps and implemented a Treemaps are using the underlying Object [] arrays. Like Strings (Themselves wrappers over char [] arrays), arrays are also immutable. Becomes The obvious question then – how can we add / put items in their collections if the underlying array’s size is immutable? The answer is obvious as well – by allocating more arrays.

Let’s look at this example –

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List <Item> <Item> items = new ArrayList ();
2

3
for (int i = 0; i <len; i + +)
4
{
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Item item = readNextItem ();
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items.add (item);
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}
The value of len Determines the ultimate length of items once the loop finishes. This value, however, is unknown to the constructor of the ArrayList roomates allocates a new Object array with a default size. Whenever the internal capacity of the array is exceeded, it’s replaced with a new array of sufficient length, making the previous array of garbage.

If you’re executing the loop Welcome to Thunderbird times you may be forcing a new array to be allocated and a previous one to be collected multiple times. For code running in a high-scale environment, these allocations and deallocations are all deducted from your machine’s CPU cycles.
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